Margaret Sanger: Planned Parenthood Founder Shares Racist Vision in Her Own Words

Posted on November 1, 2016 in Life by

Margaret SangerYou might have missed the historic anniversary that took place recently. There was fanfare and celebration and the media even made sure to mention it. Sadly though, the celebration was over the millions of unborn babies killed by Planned Parenthood.

The 100th year of the world’s largest abortion merchant saw everyone from celebrities to politicians applaud and thank Planned Parenthood for their efforts in killing the unborn. Many people, however, have no idea that Planned Parenthood was founded by a racist woman that hated minorities and anyone that was different than herself.

Margaret Sanger was a first-class racist that had ties to the Klu Klux Klan and routinely wished that minorities could be exterminated. An article recently recounted some of her statements and writings. They are posted below so you can educate yourself, and share them with others in an effort to help people see the true intent behind Planned Parenthood and the push to abort the unborn.

In a letter to Dr. Clarence Gamble in 1939, Sanger wrote: “We do not want word to go out that we want to exterminate the Negro population and the minister is the man who can straighten out that idea if it ever occurs to any of their more rebellious members” (Margaret Sanger commenting on the ‘Negro Project’ in a letter to Dr. Clarence Gamble, December 10, 1939).

“By all means there should be no children when either mother or father suffers from such diseases as tuberculosis, gonorrhea, syphilis, cancer, epilepsy, insanity, drunkenness and mental disorders. In the case of the mother, heart disease, kidney trouble and pelvic deformities are also a serious bar to childbearing … No more children should be born when the parents, though healthy themselves, find that their children are physically or mentally defective” (Margaret Sanger, “Woman and the New Race,” 1920, Ch. 7).

“The main objects of the Population Congress would be … to apply a stern and rigid policy of sterilization and segregation to that grade of population whose progeny is tainted, or whose inheritance is such that objectionable traits may be transmitted to offspring[;] to give certain dysgenic groups in our population their choice of segregation or sterilization” (Margaret Sanger, “A Plan for Peace,” 1932).

In a 1957 interview with Mike Wallace, Margaret Sanger revealed: “I think the greatest sin in the world is bringing children into the world—that have disease from their parents, that have no chance in the world to be a human being practically. Delinquents, prisoners, all sorts of things just marked when they’re born. That to me is the greatest sin—that people can—can commit.”

In her autobiography, Sanger described a presentation she gave at a Klu Klux Klan rally in 1926: “I accepted an invitation to talk to the women’s branch of the Ku Klux Klan … I saw through the door dim figures parading with banners and illuminated crosses … I was escorted to the platform, was introduced, and began to speak … In the end, through simple illustrations I believed I had accomplished my purpose. A dozen invitations to speak to similar groups were proffered” (Margaret Sanger: “An Autobiography,” p. 366).

Her articles include:

“Some Moral Aspects of Eugenics” (June 1920)

“The Eugenic Conscience” (February 1921)

“The Purpose of Eugenics” (December 1924)

“Birth Control and Positive Eugenics” (July 1925)

“Birth Control: The True Eugenics” (August 1928)

Has the racist, eugenics vision of Sanger been preserved by Planned Parenthood? The article concludes with the following statement that answers that question clearly:

“The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Abortion Surveillance report revealed that between 2007 and 2010, nearly 36 percent of all abortions in the U.S. were performed on black children, even though black Americans make up only 13 percent of our population. Another 21 percent of abortions were performed on Hispanics and seven percent more on other minority groups, for a total of 64 percent of U.S. abortions tragically preformed on minority groups. Margaret Sanger would have been proud of the effects of her legacy.”

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