Tag Archives: conscience

Will the Supreme Court Force the Baker to Bake a Cake?

Posted on July 13, 2017 in Religious Freedom, Sexuality by

One element to this story (and others like it) that continues to intrigue me is that the customers could have gone to any other cake shop to get their cake. Do they really want to force someone to make a cake for their event under threat of government penalty? Will we next begin forcing artists to paint? Or forcing musicians to sing? What would be the difference between forcing a musician to write and sing a song for your same-sex wedding and forcing a baker to bake a cake? If one can be done, can’t the other?

There is a Difference Between Political Statements and Religious Convictions

Posted on January 5, 2017 in Public Policy, Religious Freedom by

People should be free to live and do business according to their convictions, even if that means refusing to serve food to Donald Trump supporters.

GrubHub CEO Doesn’t Want to Do Business with Trump Supporters and I Support Him

Posted on December 8, 2016 in Religious Freedom by

After the election of Donald Trump a number of CEO’s made it clear that Trump-supporters are not welcome at their companies. This article shares the reactions by several CEO’s at various companies’ that decided it was a good idea to tell Trump supporters that they are not welcome at their company.

Now, I’m all for the first amendment rights of these owners making it clear where they stand. And, I fully support their right to do business with whomever they choose. I’m also supportive of their right to refuse to do business with anyone they want. Business owners should have the right to adhere to their conscience and convictions, and should not be forced to conduct business that would violate those convictions.

ESPN Fired Curt Schilling for His Message and I Support That Decision

Posted on May 4, 2016 in Public Policy, Sexuality by

ESPN has dared to fire analyst Curt Schilling for his comments regarding transgender people using the women’s bathroom. You might not want to hear this but I agree with ESPN.

Yes, you read that right. I agree with ESPN’s decision to fire Curt Schilling. ESPN said that they fired Schilling because he did not represent the “inclusive company” that ESPN wanted to be. Schilling said that biological men should use the men’s bathroom and not be permitted in the women’s bathroom. That was enough for ESPN to fire Schilling and I think they should have every right to do so.

Government Demands Christian Support and Promote Gay Pride Parade (Video)

Posted on November 5, 2014 in Religious Freedom, Sexuality by

What if you were asked to produce a message supporting something that violated your conscience, or religious convictions? Would you do it?

That is exactly the position the owner of a Christian t-shirt printing business found himself in when he was asked to print a t-shirt promoting the local gay-pride festival. When the Lexington, KY based Gay and Lesbian Services Organization asked Hands On Originals, a Christian-owned printing company, to print their gay-pride parade shirts, owner Blaine Adamson declined.

But, lest anyone believe this is a case of hate, bigotry, or discrimination, a few details need to be known. First, Hands On Originals has worked with gays in the past, even employing gay people at one time. A recent article at The Blaze notes:

UPDATE: Idaho City Reverses Decision to Force Pastor to Perform Gay Wedding Ceremonies

Posted on October 31, 2014 in Marriage, Religious Freedom by

The city of Coeur d’ Alene in Idaho became the center of a major religious freedom battle after the city said it would force the pastor of a small wedding chapel to perform same-sex wedding ceremonies.

The Hitching Post is a for-profit wedding chapel that is owned and operated by devout Christians, the Knapps. After a non-discrimination ordinance was passed in the city the local city council told the Knapps they would have to perform same-sex ceremonies in order to comply with the ordinance.

The Knapps, in adhering to their religious convictions, said they would refuse to perform such ceremonies as they would violate their religious convictions. The city told them they could face massive fines and jail time for refusal. The Knapps didn’t back down.

After igniting national outrage the city has reversed their decision and said the Knapps will NOT have to perform same-sex ceremonies. A recent article at Christian Today says:

A Man’s Response When He Was Refused Service for Being Conservative Should Be a Lesson to All

Posted on March 6, 2014 in Religious Freedom by

We’ve all heard of a Christian being sued for effusing to take part in a same-sex ceremony. Sure you have. There’s a baker in Colorado, a photographer in New Mexico, a florist in Washington, these are just a few of the many people being attacked by LGBT activists and the government for refusing to violate their religious convictions. (If you’re not sure what I’m talking about, click here.)

Have you ever wondered what would happen if a straight person was ‘discriminated” against by a homosexual simply for being straight, conservative, or Christian?

Wonder no more.

Not long ago Alan Sears, the president of Arizona based legal group Alliance Defending Freedom, was turned down by a photographer when asked to take a family photo for a Christmas card.

Does the Bible Justify Refusing to Serve Homosexual Weddings?

Posted on February 27, 2014 in Public Policy, Religious Freedom by

Note: This article is a follow up to yesterday’s post in which I discussed the article by Kirsten Powers and responses to her article.

Predictably, the pending law in Arizona that would allow businesses to refuse service to homosexuals based on their religious convictions has stirred up controversy around the nation. Proponents of the legislation say it is needed to ensure the religious and conscience rights of Christian business owners are protected from government coercion and mandate. Opponents say the bills are just an excuse for people to discriminate.

What was not predictable in this discussion was how divided Christians themselves would be on the issue. Some Christians are saying no one should have the right to refuse service – not even Christians, and not even when rendering service would violate a person’s convictions. Other Christians are baffled by that position and reiterate that the government should not be allowed to force a person to violate his or her deeply held religious convictions. Dr. Albert Mohler recently said that this was “perhaps the strangest and most disappointing dimension of the current controversy.”

Russell Moore, Kirsten Powers, Erick Erickson: Should Christians Be Forced to Bake Cakes for Homosexuals?

Posted on February 26, 2014 in Marriage, Public Policy by

Are Christian vendors being hypocrites for refusing to provide services to same-sex ceremonies citing a violation of their faith while continuing to provide services for other unbiblical weddings?

That is the question that is beginning to swirl in light of several state bills that would give Christian business owners the right to refuse service to homosexual couples seeking their services for weddings. Those bills, introduced in Tennessee, Ohio, Kansas, and awaiting the governor’s signature in Arizona, are a response to lawsuits by homosexuals against “wedding vendors” that refused to render services saying to do so would violate their faith.

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