Tag Archives: pray

Pastor Says it is “Bordering on Heresy” to Pray for the President?

Posted on August 10, 2017 in Public Policy, Religious Freedom, Theology by

These comments were made on an MSNBC show by the pastor and NAACP leader much to the surprise of many that saw the photo as something to be encouraged by. After all, many presidents in history have asked for prayer for wisdom and courage during their time as president. Apparently Barber is not one of those that is encouraged.

I’m trying to figure out why a “pastor” is so vocally opposed to the world’s most powerful leader being prayed over by faith leaders. What could possibly be so offensive to a “pastor” about our president seeking and receiving spiritual direction? What am I missing about this image of the President of the United States and his Vice President seeking prayer and wisdom from God that is so problematic?

Resources for Christian Parents Seeking to Raise Kids in a Sinful World

Posted on October 25, 2016 in Family, Theology by

As a parent that is deeply committee to imparting my faith to my children, I am always looking for resources to help. I am often overwhelmed by the task of sharing my faith with my kids, teaching them, and training them. I fail daily and need the wise counsel of those who have gone before me.

With that in mind, the following list is some helpful resources for everything from praying for your kids to taking them to church. There’s insight on answering kids’ biblical questions and tips for raising Godly kids. And, at the end is a list of books and other resources that can provide further support in your task as a parent of bringing the Gospel to your children. I hope this is a helpful list of resources that provide encouragement and support for you, mom and dad.

Why Require Unregenerate Children to Act Like They’re Good?

“Here are at least three reasons why Christian parents should require their small children (regenerate or unregenerate) to behave in ways that conform externally to God’s revealed will. I say “small children” because as a child gets older, there are certain external conformities to God’s revealed will that should be required and others that should not. It seems to me, for example, while parents should require drug-free, respectful decency from a 15-year-old, it would do little good to require an unbelieving and indifferent 15-year-old to read his Bible every day. But it would be wise to require that of a 6-year-old, while doing all we can to help him enjoy it and see the benefit in it.”

Public School Learns a Lesson After Telling Students They Can’t Pray in Cafeteria

Posted on February 25, 2016 in Home School, Religious Freedom by

Imagine your child and a few friends bowing their heads to say a prayer in the cafeteria at school before eating their lunch. As a parent you would be proud of their small demonstration of their faith. And you would be more than a little irritated if the principal of the school told your child that prayer was not permitted and the group had to stop immediately.

That scenario happened in a Wyoming school when students were told they needed permission to pray, and after receiving permission must pray in the hallway so other students wouldn’t see the prayer and be offended.

A recent article reports that the school argued that by praying in the cafeteria the students were creating a “captive audience” and forcing others to see, hear, and be part of their prayer. The principal wanted to avoid offending anyone – except the Christians it would seem – by making sure no one would see or hear the prayer.

But, when the Alliance Defending Freedom (ADF) – a legal organization that defends religious freedom – stepped in, the school changed its tone. ADF sent a letter to the school threatening legal action if the school continued to infringe on the students’ 1st amendment rights to pray:

Should Children Be Allowed or Encouraged to Pray?

Posted on February 11, 2016 in Family, Theology by

Now I lay me down to sleep,
I pray the Lord my soul to keep,
If I should die before I wake,
I pray the Lord my soul to take.

That was the first prayer I remember praying. I prayed it each night with one of my parents before going to sleep. Somewhere along the way I stopped praying that prayer and started praying my own prayers. But that prayer was said with the heart of a child that sincerely wanted to talk to God but didn’t necessarily know how.

I don’t know if you’ve ever thought about the idea of children praying and all the theological implications behind it. As a theology student I can say I have not. As a parent I can say it never occurred to me. That is, until I read an article by Tim Challies in which he answers a question about whether or not it is appropriate to let kids pray.

This is the Kind of Coach I Want My Kids Playing For

Posted on December 31, 2015 in Public Policy, Religious Freedom by

Suppose you’re a high-school football coach that has received praise and accolades in your annual review for the last 7 years. You’ve also been told by athletes and parents about what a good influence you are on the players and what a great role model you are. You don’t do anything special or different for your entire tenure as a coach. Then, one day you find out the school is placing you on administrative leave and suggesting you not be re-hired.

What would you think?

That is the position coach Joe Kennedy found himself in when the local Washington state school district he worked for refused to allow him to continue saying silent prayers on the football field.

Here’s the story.

In 2008 Coach Kennedy saw the movie “Facing the Giants” and decided to start praying for his team. He would stroll out to the field before and after games to say a silent prayer for the athletes. He didn’t tell anyone, didn’t invite anyone, he just started praying. Before long members of his team joined him and they would silently pray before and after games. No one was forced. No one was disciplined or removed from the team for not praying. It was a completely voluntary routine.

Pastor Appreciation Month! Do We Really Need It?

Posted on October 17, 2014 in Theology by

You may not have known that October is “Pastor Appreciation Month,” but that’s only because it wasn’t in the church bulletin or on the website. Even if it was announced from the pulpit last week in the service I am guessing you forgot by the time you walked out the door. Hey, no biggie.

All joking aside, this month is an opportunity to show your pastor that you truly appreciate him, his ministry, and his family. We have days to show our appreciation to teachers, public workers, and administrative professionals so I heartily endorse a month to show our spiritual shepherds that we appreciate their life of ministry.

You might be wondering why we need such a day.

13 Simple Things Anyone Can Do to Defend Religious Liberty

Posted on July 22, 2014 in Religious Freedom by

You probably already know by now that there is a very real war against religious liberty taking place. Every day it seems I read another headline about a Christian losing a job, being denied employment, being sued, or being threatened by the government for their religious convictions. Finally people are waking up to the fact that many of the “politically correct” views lawmakers and activists are seeking to enact are diametrically opposed the religious convictions of millions of Americans.

What is needed now is for people to stand up and boldly refuse to sit in silence while their religious liberty and freedoms are taken away.

You might be willing, but wondering “what can I do to help?”

The good news is that taking a stand for religious liberty is easier than you might think. But if we all take part and do a little it will make an enormous impact. So, to that end I’ve copied a list of simple things anyone can do to defend religious liberty. (This list originally appeared here.)

I Don’t Think President Obama Prays Like I Pray

Posted on May 12, 2014 in Religious Freedom by

Prayer has been in the news a lot lately. The recent Supreme Court ruling that public prayer before town council meetings is indeed constitutional has a lot to do with that. Opponents of pubic prayer, like American United for Separation of Church and State, American Atheists, and the Freedom from Religion Foundation, believe that any prayer offered in public is inherently a government attempt to coerce people into a specific religion. Apparently they don’t believe people are smart enough to think for themselves.

Before the Supreme Court ruled on this case prayer was in the news as a result of a tragic shooting that took place during the Easter season.

A former Klu Klux Klan member killed three people at Jewish center in Overland Park, Kansas over Easter weekend in a display of racial bigotry that shocked many. President Obama took the opportunity to encourage religious tolerance during his Easter address from the White House.

“Nobody should have to worry about their security when gathering with their fellow believers,” Obama said. “No one should ever have to fear for their safety when they go to pray.”

The Gospel Coalition: 9 Things You Should Know About the National Day of Prayer

Posted on May 1, 2014 in Religious Freedom by

Today is the National Day of Prayer, an annual day of observance celebrated by Americans of various faiths. Here are nine things you should know about the day when people are asked “to turn to God in prayer and meditation.”

1. The National Day of Prayer is an annual observance held on the first Thursday of May, inviting people of all faiths to pray for the nation. It was created in 1952 by a joint resolution of the United States Congress, and signed into law by President Harry S. Truman.

Archives

%d bloggers like this: