Tag Archives: same sex

Will the Supreme Court Force the Baker to Bake a Cake?

Posted on July 13, 2017 in Religious Freedom, Sexuality by

One element to this story (and others like it) that continues to intrigue me is that the customers could have gone to any other cake shop to get their cake. Do they really want to force someone to make a cake for their event under threat of government penalty? Will we next begin forcing artists to paint? Or forcing musicians to sing? What would be the difference between forcing a musician to write and sing a song for your same-sex wedding and forcing a baker to bake a cake? If one can be done, can’t the other?

If You Plan to Live by Your Faith – Read This

Posted on March 1, 2017 in Marriage, Public Policy, Religious Freedom by

In a stunning case of injustice, the Washington state Supreme Court ruled against Barronelle Stutzman, a florist that has been a pillar in her community for decades. Her crime: living out her Christian faith in public.

As the owner of Arlene’s Flowers, Stutzman served everyone in her community. She served people without prejudice and built relationships with the people she served, including homosexuals. When one of her long-time customers asked her to create floral art for his same-sex wedding, Stutzman politely declined, saying it would violate her religious convictions. Stutzman did exactly the same thing as designer Theallat, she refused to associate with something she found to be wrong.

The Faith of Chip and Joanna Gaines Makes Them (And Us) “Cultural Heretics”

Posted on December 21, 2016 in Marriage, Sexuality, Theology by

You probably saw the article a couple of weeks ago decrying the fact that Chip and Joanna Gaines attend a church where they teach that marriage is the union of one man and one woman. The now infamous hit piece by BuzzFeed lamented that this very popular TV couple are conservative, Christian Americans that believe in traditional marriage.

This personal attack on the Gaines has much to teach us about the new reality we live in as part of the sexual and moral revolution.

If you’re not familiar with the story, here’s a short recap from a recent article:

If Homosexuals Can Marry then a Mother and Son Should Be Allowed to Marry As Well

Posted on September 1, 2016 in Marriage, Public Policy by

If you support homosexual “marriage,” you owe it to yourself to read what Matt Walsh says about a mother and son fighting for their right to “love” one another. All of the arguments used to defend and legitimize homosexual relationships and “marriage” are being used by the mother and son to defend and legitimize their incestuous relationship. And the things is: if you support the logic and reasoning used to defend homosexual “marriage” then you have no moral or legal ground to refuse to support incestuous relationships.

To prove that point, Walsh runs through the main arguments used to defend homosexual “marriage” and then applies them to incestuous relationships. Namely, he cites:

Islamic Leader Calls for “Right” of Polygamy to Be Recognized

Posted on August 24, 2016 in Marriage, Public Policy by

As same-sex “marriage” became a cultural obsession in our country, polygamy advocates quietly stood in the shadows, waiting. They were waiting to see what the courts would do as they planned to take action in light of their decision. When the Supreme Court of the United States decided to create a constitutional right to same-sex “marriage” and legalize it, polygamy advocates rejoiced.

If the government decides that two men or two women have the right to be married, what possible legal or moral ground is there for the government to fall back on in refusing to legalize polygamy? That is the question that will soon be asked, and need to be answered.

The question is already being asked abroad.

When the Government Doesn’t Protect Convictions No One is Free

Posted on February 10, 2016 in Marriage, Religious Freedom by

Those words come from Daniel McArthur, general manager of Ashers Baking Company, as he describes what it is like to have the government demand he and his family of Christians make a cake with a message that violates their religious beliefs.

It all started when a man asked for a cake with the words “support gay marriage” on it. McArthur and the people at Ashers refused to make it citing their religious beliefs. A legal battle ensued and the government sided with the customer saying that Ashers had violated the Equality Act and “discriminated” against the man. Ashers was fined $765 for “injury to feelings” and told to make the cake.

By the way, this all happened in Norther Ireland where gay marriage is illegal.

Will the Church Be Protected from the Legal Ramifications of Same-Sex “Marriage”?

Posted on December 30, 2015 in Marriage, Public Policy, Religious Freedom by

It’s clear from the plain understanding of these laws that anyone, not just a church, has the right to live and do business according to their sincerely held religious beliefs. The idea that the Supreme Court or any governing body can force a person to support anything that violates their conscience or religious convictions is completely foreign to the American Constitution. (This includes the taxpayer funding of abortion.) Our Founders specifically sought to create a place where people would not be forced to violate their convictions.

The proposed resolution goes on to cite cases from around the country where Christians have been prosecuted for their refusal to support same-sex “marriage.” These examples include a photographer in New Mexico, baker in Colorado, florist in Washington, and others that have seen their business and personal lives thrown into turmoil by an overzealous government and complicit media that are chomping at the bit to make examples of anyone that refuse to bow to their agenda.

The resolution goes on to propose the following law designed to protect churches and the people that work for them, as well as religious organizations and their employees and Christian-owned businesses:

Here’s What I Think About Kim Davis and Christians Ignoring the “Law of the Land”

Posted on September 23, 2015 in Marriage, Religious Freedom by

The more I read the less I’m sure of. Is Kim Davis an example that Christians should take note of for her refusal to compromise her religious convictions? Is she a criminal interfering with “the law of the land” that needs to either “get with the program” or get out of the way?

One thing I am sure of is that most people, by now, have at least heard of Kim Davis. And I am fairly certain that most people have made up their mind about whether they view Davis as a hero or a villain. But all the noise and static in the media and on blogs takes time to wade through.

At the risk of personifying irony by becoming part of the noise and static, I wanted to share some thoughts on what could, potentially, be one of the most crucial incidents in our nation’s history.

There seems to be a grave misunderstanding taking place that could alter the course of events if not adequately cleared up. Some are inclined to think that the Supreme Court of the United States makes laws in our country when, in fact, they do not. The Supreme Court has no authority to make laws but, in reality, is to uphold existing laws. It is Congress that has the task of making laws. For this reason Kim Davis is well within the bounds of law to refuse to sign a marriage certificate for a same-sex couple. Why?

Maybe The Kentucky Clerk Should Be Jailed For Refusing to Issue Marriage Licenses. Maybe?

Posted on September 9, 2015 in Marriage, Religious Freedom by

So Daniel refused to compromise his convictions, even while working for the king (a secular entity). That decision led to his punishment; a punishment Daniel was fully prepared to accept, even to the point of death. At no time did Daniel plead his case or demand his “religious convictions” be honored. The end result was that Daniel’s accusers were thrown into the den of lions where they all perished, and the king decreed that only the “God of Daniel” was the true God.

Does this biblical account relate to the Kentucky clerk that now sits in prison for refusing to compromise her convictions?

I think there is a relationship between the account of Daniel and this Kentucky clerk refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. The relationship is that Ms. Davis – the clerk – is living according to her religious convictions despite the laws of the land. The current law makes it illegal to deny a marriage license to any couple seeking to be married, refusing to comply with that law is an act of disobedience to the law.

Why Do Christians Accept Ideas That Are Unbiblical?

Posted on September 8, 2015 in Marriage, Sexuality by

At one time our Founders sought refuge from government persecution for their religious convictions. They left their homes to establish a place where people could freely live out their faith in every aspect of their life. What is happening today is a return to that same government persecution that our Founders desperately wanted to leave behind.

One area this seems most apparent is in the effort to force Christians to accept homosexuality and same-sex “marriage.” Sure, there may have been a goal of simply seeing this lifestyle legitimized and legalized; but that appears now to have been a precursor for the larger goal of forcing every person to accept and celebrate it. But there can now be no doubt that seeking simple “equality” is a long forgotten idea. And the rhetoric we were fed that “no one would be affected” was nothing more than a well-rehearsed talking point in a carefully crafted campaign.

A statement in an article from a couple months ago echoes what, I believe, many Americans are thinking:

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